UTCS FACULTY CANDIDATE: Ingolf Krueger/University of California San Diego Systems of Systems Integration with Rich Services ACES 2.302 Thursday March 6 2008 11:00 a.m.

Contact Name: 
Jenna Whitney
Date: 
Mar 6, 2008 11:00am - 12:00pm

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Type of Talk: UTCS FACULTY CANDIDATE

Speaker/Affiliation: Ing

olf Krueger/University of California San Diego

Date/Time: Thursday
March 6 2008 11:00 a.m.

Location: ACES 2.302

Host: Don B

atory

Talk Title: Systems of Systems Integration with Rich Services<

br>
Talk Abstract:
Complex software-intensive systems have a profou

nd
impact on our daily lives and society at large. Innovations in
m

odern cars and airplanes are to a large extent driven by
software. Th

e cyberinfrastructure for science and electronic
business has literally
become indispensable. New systems
emerge from the integration of exis

ting and emerging systems
into systems of systems. To manage complexity
modern
integration approaches increasingly rely on service-oriented<

br>modeling and implementation techniques. Web services and
related te

chnologies predominantly address implementation
concerns of service-ori

ented development. How to systematically
engineer service-oriented int

egration architectures is still an area
of active research. In this pr

esentation I will establish the connection
between (a) a precisely def

ined notion of service (b) an architectural
blueprint for service comp

osition and (c) a development process for
service-oriented integration

architectures. Services and components
are formally introduced as part

ial and total behavior specifications
respectively. The architectural

blueprint called Rich Services defines
a framework for enriching parti

al services with infrastructure services
such as authentication autho

rization and failure management -- at
the level of both logical and de

ployment/implementation architectures.
The development process defines
systematic development steps from
requirements elicitation to architect

ure definition and implementation.
This presentation thus bridges the

gap between a precise service notion
and its practical application in t

he development of large software systems.