UTCS Colloquium/AI: Jeremy Wyatt/University of Birmingham Talking with Robots: A Case Study in Cognitive Architectures for Robots TAY 3.128 Monday July 7 2008 2:00 p.m.

Contact Name: 
Jenna Whitney
Date: 
Jul 7, 2008 2:00pm - 3:00pm

There is a signup schedule for this event (UT EID required).

Ty

pe of Talk: UTCS Colloquium/AI

Speaker/Affiliation: Jeremy Wyatt/U

niversity of Birmingham

Date/Time: Monday July 7 2008 2:00 p.m.<

br>
Location: TAY 3.128

Host: Ben Kuipers

Talk Title: Ta

lking with Robots: A Case Study in Cognitive Architectures for Robots
Talk Abstract:
In what ways can we integrate multiple types of sensing
and action in a
robot? This question gets to the heart of deep issues i

n AI such as the
nature and use of representations and the control of

the flow of
information in a cognitive architecture. In this talk I wil

l describe some
work we are doing on architectures for cognitive robots

. I will describe
an architectural schema we have developed a toolkit

for developing
robot systems using it examples of robot systems that w

e have built
and some of the problems that arise if the schema is acce

pted. These
include four research problems which we refer to as the pro

blems of
binding; filtering; processing management and action fusion.
I will
describe our current approaches to the first three with a focu

s on
using existing approaches POMDP planning to solving a simple
p

rocessing management problem in vision. If I have time I will also
say

what I think is missing what is wrong and where it needs to go.

Sp

eaker Bio:
Jeremy Wyatt (www.cs.bham.ac.uk/%7Ejlw) is a senior lecturer
in the
School of Computer Science at the University of Birmingham. He

is
a co-director of the Intelligent Robotics Laboratory and a Leverhulm

e
Trust Research Fellow. His research interests include: reinforcement

learning learning and planning in POMDPs cognitive architectures for

robots robot learning committee machines and ensemble learning
p

lanning in underwater vehicles and planning of visual processing.
He h

as a PhD in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Edinburgh
(1

997) and supervised the 2004 winner of the British Computer Society''s

Distinguished Dissertation Award. Among other things he has worked
on t

he CoSy project on cognitive systems the CogX project on
self-understan

ding and self-extension in cognitive systems and a project
on automate

d diagnosis for autonomous underwater vehicles.