UTCS Colloquia: Herb Lin/Chief Scientist for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board: "Understanding U.S. Cyberattack Policy" ACES 2.302, Tuesday, March 2, 2010, 11:00 a.m.

Contact Name: 
Jenna Whitney
Date: 
Mar 2, 2010 11:00am - 12:00pm

There is a sign up schedule for this talk:

http://www.cs.

utexas.edu/department/webevent/utcs/events/cgi/eidshow.cgi?person=HerbLin

n
Type of Talk: UTCS Colloquia
Speaker/Affiliation: Herbert S. Lin/Comp

uter Science and Telecommunications Board

Date/Time: Tuesday, March 2

, 2010 11:00 a.m.

Location: ACES 2.302

Host: Bruce Porter and Bo

b Inman

Talk Title: "Understanding U.S. Cyberattack Policy"

Talk

Abstract: Although there is a substantial literature on the potential impac

t of a cyberattack on the societal infrastructure of the United States, li

ttle has been written about the use of cyberattack as an instrument of U.S.
policy. Cyberattacks-actions intended to damage or adversary computer syst

ems or networks-are an avowed part of the U.S. cybersecurity posture. Furth

ermore, they can be used for a variety of military purposes and for certai

n missions of the intelligence community, such as covert action. They may

be useful for certain domestic law enforcement purposes, and some analysts
believe that they might be useful for certain private sector entities who

are themselves under cyberattack. A recent report of the National Research

Council, "Technology, Policy, Law and Ethics Regarding U.S. Acquisition

and Use of Cyberattack Capabilities" is the first comprehensive unclassifie

d treatment of this subject, and this talk will explore important characte

ristics of cyberattack and cyberexploitation, address current policy, des

cribe some of the international legal issues that arise, and comment on th

e notion of cyberdeterrence.

Speaker Bio:
Dr. Herbert Lin is chief s

cientist at the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Re

search Council of the National Academies, where he has been study director
of major projects on public policy and information technology. These studi

es include a 1996 study on national cryptography policy (Cryptography''s Ro

le in Securing the Information Society), a 1991 study on the future of com

puter science (Computing the Future), a 1999 study of Defense Department s

ystems for command, control, communications, computing, and intelligenc