UTCS Colloquia/AI - Yulia Lierler/University of Kentucky, "Parsing Combinatory Categorial Grammar via Planning in Answer Set Programming", ACES 2.402

Contact Name: 
Jenna Whitney
Date: 
Mar 30, 2012 11:00am - 12:00pm

There is a sign-up schedule for this event that can be found at

http://apps.cs.utexas.edu/talkschedules/cgi/list_events.cgi

Type o

f Talk: UTCS Colloquia/AI

Speaker/Affiliation: Yulia Lierler/Universit

y of Kentucky

Talk Audience: UTCS Faculty, Graduate Students, Underg

raduate Students and Outside Interested Parties

Date/Time: Friday, Ma

rch 30, 2012, 11:00 am

Location: ACES 2.402

Host: Vladimir Lifs

chitz

Talk Title: Parsing Combinatory Categorial Grammar via Planning

in Answer Set Programming

Abstract:
The task of parsing -- recoverin

g the internal structure of sentences -- is an important task in natural la

nguage processing. Combinatory categorial grammar (CCG) is one of the gramm

ar formalisms that are used for natural language parsing. We propose and im

plement a new approach to CCG parsing that relies on a prominent knowledge

representation formalism, answer set programming (ASP) -- a declarative pr

ogramming paradigm. We formulate the task of CCG parsing as a planning prob

lem, cast it as an answer set program and use an ASP computational tool to
compute solutions that correspond to valid parses. As a result we obtain w

hat is the only CCG-based wide-coverage parser capable of producing multipl

e parses for a sentence. In addition, compared to other approaches, there
is no need to implement a specific parsing algorithm when this declarative
method is used. Interestingly, this project "marries" several fundamental
AI areas: natural language processing, planning, and knowledge represent

ation.

Bio:
Yuliya Lierler is a Computing Innovation Fellow Postdoc

at the Computer Science Department at the University of Kentucky. She compl

eted her Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Texas at Austin in

2010. She is intereted in knowledge representation, automated reasoning,

declarative problem solving, and natural language understanding.