Artificial Intelligence

In a World of Driverless Cars

March 16, 2012

The Cities page on Atlantic.com takes a look at research on the intersections of the future done by computer scientist Peter Stone. ...

UT professor leads research into autonomous intersection technology

March 4, 2012

Having already designed an SUV that drives itself, a project group at the University of Texas is now working on the technological next step: an autonomous intersection that lets driverless vehicles navigate without stoplights or stop signs. ...

Driving on Autopilot

February 28, 2012

Imagine driving down a street at rush hour. It’s a typical commute, but this time, you’re reading a newspaper in the backseat. The driver’s seat is empty—your car is driving itself. Sounds like a fantasy, right? ...

Avoiding Red Lights by Booking Ahead

February 21, 2012

Discovery News asks, "Computers can reserve your plane ticket, your hotel room and your restaurant table. Why not your place at an intersection?" ...

UT works on driverless car of future

February 21, 2012

High-tech invention would revolutionize roadways ...

Computer Scientist Developing Intersections of the Future With Fully Autonomous Vehicles

February 20, 2012

Peter Stone rides in Marvin, the autonomous car designed by he and his students. Photo by Wyatt McSpadden. ...

Intersections of the Future: Using Fully Autonomous Vehicles

February 6, 2012

The future looks like this: You are sitting in the backseat of the car drinking coffee and reading the news on your tablet. ...

Professor works with graduate students, undergrads to develop robot technology

November 13, 2011

As an educator, associate computer science professor Peter Stone has a unique perspective on who, or what, can learn. Stone has spent his time at UT working with students to develop intelligent robots capable of learning and adapting to their environments. ...

Professor Drives Research of Humanoid Robots

September 29, 2011

The Daily Texan features computer science professor Peter Stone. ...

Peter Stone Named 2011 Yahoo! Faculty Research and Engagement Program Recipient

September 21, 2011

Computer science professor Peter Stone has been named a 2011 Yahoo! Faculty Research and Engagement Program (FREP) recipient and has been granted a $10,000 gift for his proposal titled “Testing a Liquidity Sensitive Market Maker for a Prediction Market on the UT Austin CS Building Opening.” ...

Peter Stone Named 2011 Yahoo! Faculty Research and Engagement Program Recipient

September 12, 2011

The Yahoo! Faculty Research and Engagement Program (FREP) is designed to produce the highest quality scientific collaborations and outcomes by engaging with faculty members working in areas of mutual interest. Through this program, academics across the globe collaborate with Yahoo! research scientists via visits to Yahoo!, access to our data and funds for their research. ...

RoboCup Remix

July 28, 2011

RoboCup Remix from Texas Science on Vimeo. The video footage is from the second half of the championship game in the 3-D Simulation league in RoboCupSoccer 2011. UT Austin Villa won the game, 4-0, over a team from Changzhou Institute of Technology in China. The audio track is “humm ok,” by Gablé (Creative Commons). ...

UT Austin Villa Wins World RoboCup Championships

July 19, 2011

AUSTIN, Texas—UT Austin Villa, a team of programmers led by University of Texas at Austin computer scientists Peter Stone and Patrick MacAlpine, has won the 2011 RoboCup Soccer championships in the 3-D simulation division. ...

One Way to Study the Schizophrenic Brain: Build One

May 15, 2011

Researchers at Yale and the University of Texas used a neural network -- a computer brain -- to test out medical theories of what causes schizophrenia. The result was a computer brain that can't tell the difference between stories about itself and fanciful stories about gangsters, and claims responsibility for terrorist acts. ...

Researchers at U. of Texas and Yale Use Computers to Simulate Schizophrenia

May 9, 2011

Computer simulations of malfunctioning brains may be the key to understanding schizophrenia and other conditions. A research team including computer scientists at the University of Texas at Austin and a professor of psychiatry at Yale have been testing various theories of how schizophrenic brains misfire as they process information. People with schizophrenia often have trouble repeating different stories, for instance, frequently combining elements of separate stories and inserting themselves into the narrative. ...

Computer claims responsibility for terrorist bombing

May 5, 2011

In a bid to help understand the way that the human brain malfunctions to cause mental illness scientists have caused a computer system to lose its mind and claim responsibilty for a terrorist bombing. The team at the University of Texas and Yale University, including Professor Risto Miikkulainen and grad student Uli Grasemann, were looking to how the human brain is affected with schizophrenia by simulating a hypothesis that excessive dopamine in the brain can cause “exaggerated salience”, whereby the brain is learning from things it shouldn’t. ...

Scientists Afflict Computers with Schizophrenia to Better Understand the Human Brain

May 5, 2011

AUSTIN, Texas—Computer networks that can’t forget fast enough can show symptoms of a kind of virtual schizophrenia, giving researchers further clues to the inner workings of schizophrenic brains, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and Yale University have found. The researchers used a virtual computer model, or “neural network,” to simulate the excessive release of dopamine in the brain. They found that the network recalled memories in a distinctly schizophrenic-like fashion. ...

Computer Vision

August 3, 2010

Every day—every minute, every second—the world’s computers are amassing visual information at an extraordinary rate. Aspiring Tarantinos are sending their two-minute videos to Youtube in the hopes of going viral. Mom and Dad are uploading their Napa Valley vacation photos to Flickr. Doctors are sending patient MRIs to medical databases, and satellites are scanning the earth for evidence of sinister activity. ...

Robots Play Winning Soccer

July 2, 2009

Texas Computer Science students are programming robots to play soccer... and winning. Current robots are only 2-feet high, but the goal is to develop robotic players large and skillful enough to beat a real-live World Cup team by 2050. Students from Texas Tech (TT) and The University of Texas at Austin (UT) use C++ to program robots to play without human interaction during the games. The robots play as a team and make individual decisions. ...

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