Department Name in Text

The consistent use of the department’s name plays a critical part in the department’s identity system. By using the official name of the department, we build greater recognition not only throughout the state, but worldwide.

The name of the department when typeset in regular text (for instance, a paragraph in a brochure) is Department of Computer Science. Typically, the name should not be ALL CAPS in text, although that format may be used in a headline or subhead as the design dictates. Do not use the logotype in regular typeset text, as in: “Here at Department of Computer Science we have several graduate program offerings.” The full name of the department is Department of Computer Science. Generally the full name is used in the first instance within a publication. Additional mentions may simply use the name “UT Computer Science” or “UTCS.” “Computer Science Department” is incorrect.

  • Do not capitalize “the” if used before the department name.
  • Use lowercase “department” not “Department” when it stands alone.
  • Avoid using “UT Comp Sci.”

These conventions cover all department communications—including posters, brochures, T-shirts, etc.—except for official letterhead, which uses the complete name.

The formal name of the department, "Department of Computer Science, The University of Texas at Austin" must be on all legal documents as well as department publications.

College Name in Text

The name of the college is College of Natural Sciences. For more information on the college's identity standards, please consult their style guide.

University Name in Text

The name of the university is The University of Texas at Austin. Do not use the acronym “UT” or “UT Austin” when communicating to outside audiences. Use the complete name of the institution or refer to it generically as “the university.” When writing for strictly internal audiences familiar with the university, it is acceptable to refer to the university as UT Austin. For other guidelines on the use of the university name, word mark and other elements, refer to: http://brand.utexas.edu/.