04/15/2021 - The National Science Foundation’s CAREER award is a prestigious award presented by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to early-career faculty who have showcased potential as academic role models and have shown excellence in their role as teacher-scholars. The award is given once every year and recipients receive a federal grant for research and education activities.  Read more
04/14/2021 - The Association for Computing Machinery has awarded Scott Aaronson the 2020 ACM Prize in Computing for groundbreaking contributions to quantum computing. Aaronson is the David J. Bruton Jr. Centennial Professor of Computer Science at The University of Texas at Austin. Read more
02/26/2014 - UTCS has been named the recipient of a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) through the CyberCorps: Scholarship for Service (SFS) program.  The SFS program will support students pursuing the university’s INFOSEC (Information Security) Certificate who also have a desire to pursue careers in information assurance to protect the government’s critical information infrastructure. Participants will receive support in the form of scholarships for tuition and fees as well as a two-year living stipend.  Read more
03/31/2012 - UTCS alum Paul Taele has been awarded an NSF East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute (EAPSI) fellowship for 2012. Paul will carry out research in beyond-surface sketch recognition and interaction techniques in Taipei, Taiwan, with Dr. Mike Chen in the Mobile, Social & HCI Research Lab at National Taiwan University. Read more
02/28/2012 - Assistant Professor Pradeep Ravikumar has been selected for an NSF CAREER Award for his project entitled "CAREER: A New Neat Framework for Statistical Machine Learning." The CAREER awards recognize promising young faculty and supports their re Read more
09/22/2011 - CNN | Joshua Rubin | September 22, 2011 -- Updated 2049 GMT (0449 HKT) Austin, Texas (CNN) -- Maybe everything really is bigger in Texas. The Lonestars, a series of blazingly fast supercomputers, put the Texas Advanced Computing Center on the map in 2003. Then came the Ranger system, which was more than 100 times more powerful than the first Lonestar computers. Read more
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