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In today's society technology rules the world. From cell phones, computers, and the internet, technology is a part of our every day life. It's a trend that is consistent throughout America and leading to a growing number of technology related jobs. From 2004 to 2014, the number of tech-related jobs grew 31% faster than jobs in other industries like business and healthcare.  In a wider scope, STEM jobs (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) grew 11.4 percent over the same period compared to the 4.5 percent growth of other jobs. 

While the U.S as a whole is experiencing major growth in this job category, it isn't wide spread. Specific areas of the country are dominating the job market when it comes to creating new tech jobs. Forbes magazine did a study on the percent of tech job growth in the last 10 year across 52 of the largest metropolitan cities in the country. According to the magazine, Austin, Texas takes the top spot in cities with the most technology-related careers. 

Our No. 1 city, Austin, Texas, boasts the strongest expansion in tech sector employment of any of the nation’s 52 largest metropolitan areas from 2004 to 2014, 73.9%,  as well as 36.4% growth in STEM jobs, the fourth-highest growth rate in the country. 
-Forbes.com

The live music capital of the world in the last four years has experienced a 73 percent job growth in the tech industry. This has led to over 53,000 tech jobs in the city. STEM occupations have also witnessed this growth with a job increase of 36.4 percent in the last four years and over 86,000 jobs.  With power house tech headquarters and thousands of tech start ups, it's no surprise that the city came in at number one.

Other cities that made the list include Raleigh, N.C. with a 62 percent increase, San Jose, CA with 70.2 percent, Houston, TX with 42 percent and San Francisco, CA with 67.5 percent.

To see the full list of cities and their statistics you can read the original Forbes pieces here

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