07/31/2018 - Ewin Tang, a 2018 University of Texas at Austin graduate in computer science and mathematics, is receiving national attention for a feat he accomplished at the age of 18 by disproving, as part of his honors thesis, a widely held assumption about the hottest next-thing in technology, quantum computing. Read more
07/26/2018 - By Rachel Cooper, The Alcalde For the past month, the world has been watching national soccer teams from across the globe compete in a surprising and nail-biting World Cup. Although the U.S. didn’t make the cut for the 2018 version of the quadrennial tournament, there’s an unorthodox soccer team close to home that did pretty well on the international stage—a group of Longhorns and their goal-scoring robots.  Read more
07/24/2018 - This month, a group of UTCS researchers won a best paper award at the USENIX Annual Technical Conference 2018 for their paper, "TxFS: Leveraging File-System Crash Consistency to Provide ACID Transactions." Read more
07/18/2018 - Robots are everywhere, from the Roomba cleaning your floor to the first self-driving cars traveling the roads. As robots advance and help with more and more tedious or dangerous tasks, they need an easy and efficient way to learn and adapt to their surroundings. Read more
06/25/2018 - UT Austin Villa continues its winning streak in the 3D Simulation League by defeating magmaOffenburg 2-0 in the championship at last week’s RoboCup 2018 competition. Read more
06/20/2018 - A team of computer science researchers consisting of professor Lili Qiu and her Ph.D. students Wenguang Mao and Mei Wang won the Best Paper Award last week at MobiSys 2018 for their work in creating a system that can perform acoustic imaging with a smartphone. Read more
06/06/2018 - The world is made up of shapes of all kinds, from boxy cubes to perfect spheres and everything in between. Some shapes work best for certain applications; for example, only a few configurations will lead to a stable building. Read more
05/15/2018 - The only effective way to raise the confidence level of a program significantly is to give a convincing proof of its correctness. But one should not first make the program and then prove its correctness, because then the requirement of providing the proof would only increase the poor programmer’s burden. On the contrary: the programmer should let correctness proof and program grow hand-in-hand. - “The Humble Programmer,” Edsger W. Dijkstra (1972) Read more
05/08/2018 - UT College of Natural Sciences News | October 16, 2017 Nature has a way of making complex shapes from a set of simple growth rules. The curve of a petal, the swoop of a branch, even the contours of our face are shaped by these processes. What if we could unlock those rules and reverse engineer nature's ability to grow an infinitely diverse array of shapes? Read more
04/03/2018 - UT College of Natural Sciences News | Esther R Robards-Forbes Read more

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