Project Giving Tree Aims to Strengthen CS Community

Around this time every year a new group of students begins to prepare themselves to bid farewell to long days of classes and tedious homework assignments and make the shift to post grad life. The soon to be graduates of the UT Computer Science department have left their mark on the school in many ways. And now, through a special program called Project Giving Tree, these students can continue to leave their mark for years and years to come.

Peter Stone: Trinity planners should figure for effects of self-driving cars

Certain technologies go from being almost unimaginable to commonplace in what seems like the blink of an eye. For example, it was a relatively short time between when microwave ovens were introduced and when they became a standard appliance. Similar changes were brought about by the introduction of refrigerators, televisions, cell phones and personal computers. One of the next technologies that is likely to have similarly large and unforeseen effects is self-driving, or autonomous, cars. 

Peter Stone Earns Teaching Excellence Award

Professor Peter Stone

Professor Peter Stone has earned a 2015 College of Natural Sciences Teaching Excellence Award winner. The Teaching Excellence Award celebrates the members of CNS faculty that excel in the classroom. The Awards were established by Dean Mary Ann Rankin to increase recognition of the college's many exceptional faculty who are committed to teaching at either the undergraduate or graduate level.

Dr. Dana Ballard Publishes New Book, Titled "Brain Computation as Hierarchical Abstraction"

The vast differences between the brain’s neural circuitry and a computer’s silicon circuitry might suggest that they have nothing in common. In fact, as Dana Ballard argues in this book, computational tools are essential for understanding brain function. Ballard shows that the hierarchical organization of the brain has many parallels with the hierarchical organization of computing; as in silicon computing, the complexities of brain computation can be dramatically simplified when its computation is factored into different levels of abstraction.

Pages

Subscribe to Department of Computer Science RSS